When I think about a new idea or my next goal in life, I usually think big. The goal has to be ambitious and attractive to me, otherwise, it’s not worth putting effort into it. However, big goals also overwhelm me, because I don’t know where I should start. So I prepare. And I think. And I prepare. And I think. And this loop goes on.

It changed. The endless loop of thinking about the best approach to achieve the goal or to do whatever you want means that you probably try to start with something big. To break it, just do the opposite – think big, but start small.

List of books. Inspiring food for thoughts. Things I’ve done today. Big ideas that can help the community I live with. That’s are examples of running notes – useful notes, that I update all the time.

This is one type of notes I use in my plaintext personal note-taking system. In this article, I’m going to show you, how to make use of them in an effective way – using tool called Alfred.

For most people, keeping notes and other stuff in text files is ridiculous – tons of services and apps could do it better. But what the better means?

Despite the availability and diversity of note-taking solutions on the market, I haven’t found any that would meet my expectations. I tried to stick to the one app but I had felt the internal resistance to settling in one specific, often a vendor-locked solution.

The breakthrough was when I ask myself – why I even want to note this information? I had started to look for my “why” and it turned out, that I don’t need a fancy app or service to storing notes but a directory called “notes”.

In this article, I would like to show you how to prepare the script that will back up your important files to the cloud storage using a tool called restic. Even though the article is specific for macOS and Backblaze B2, you can use some techniques for creating a similar script for Linux systems.

The first draft of this article was about the code-style. I wanted to show you why it is important and why we should care about it. But the longer I thought, the stronger conviction I gained, that the code-style – whatever it means – is only a way to achieve a much more important goal.

I’m a big advocate of well-quality code. Besides good architecture, I pay attention to style – consistent spacing and indentation, coherent naming convention and other rules that make the code visually better. But how to convince someone, who never took care of style before, that is it a good thing?

The Internet is teeming with services you can take advantage of. You can store your files in the cloud, share movies, organize photo collections, talk with friends, manage your projects and so on. It also means that your data is stored outside your computer and you don’t have full control over it. 

You may use self-hosted counterparts of services. Instead of accepting vague privacy policies, you may set the rules. However, you are fully responsible for sustaining your data. 

I used to consider self-hosted services as a privacy-respective and cheap alternatives of popular services. The former is true, however, the latter factor is often far-fetched.